The Greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.

Everyone can recognise stress in their daily life. Some people seem to have more stress than others, or is it simply their reaction to events that creates stress? What is stress? And why is a physio talking about stress?

What is stress?

Fight or flight is stress at its very basic. It’s an important mechanism our brain has to cope and be ready for any perceived threat. This causes many bodily changes to prepare us for action, such as increased neural activity, muscle tone, heart rate, breathing pattern disrupted sleep etc. But stress is also emotional and responds with the same physical response. There are two forms of stress positive and negative. It helps to have a balance of both to make logical decisions.

Positive: It can motivate us into action and achieve our goals.

Negative: Too much causes anxiety and other health issues.

There are many forms of emotional stress. Everyone manages stress differently, making it easier for some people to cope with than others. Below are the leading causes of negative stress.

  • Workplace environment, too many emails, phone calls, long hours
  • Divorce/breakups/relationship difficulties
  • Demands of family/children (sleep patterns, household duties, balancing activities)
  • Car accidents. Being stuck in traffic
  • Theft, burglary, loss of personal property
  • Loss of employment or business
  • Death of a family member or close friend
  • Cash flow problems
  • Poor academic performance/work overload

How can stress impact my injury?

When we’re injured we have the mechanical pain from the damaged structures. But carrying negative stress causes increased sensitivity of our pain receptors and decreases the inhibitory interneurones in the central nervous system that regulate how much pain we feel (1,2). If we find ways to channel our stress better the pains we feel from injury become more tolerable.

  1. Donello et al, (2011) A peripheral adrenoceptor-mediated sympathetic mechanism can transform stress-induced analgesia into hyperalgesia.
  2. Corcoran et al, (2015) The Role of the Brain’s Endocannabinoid System in Pain and Its Modulation by Stress.

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