Souiss 2013 & Rae 2017

How many of us burn the candle at both ends? Balancing a busy workload, maintaining a healthy and social lifestyle. What often leads to sleep deprivation.

These two studies demonstrate the impact of sleep deprivation on performance.

Souiss tested his judo athletes with a number of measures including grip strength, anaerobic capacity and isometric test of elbow flexion. Tests were performed at 9am and 4pm after a judo match. There were 3 scenarios, full sleep (7.5hrs), partial sleep early (10pm-2am) and late (3am-6am).

The results showed with a full sleep performance was better in the afternoon. But with both groups with only partial sleep performance dropped in both the morning and afternoon. The partial sleep group woken early performed worse later in the afternoon.

Rae’s study of cyclists, measuring their strength the day after high intensity interval training, one group with full sleep (7.5hrs) and partial sleep (4hrs). They tested 24 hours later, testing peak power output and surveying fatigue and motivation.

These results showed that with sleep deprivation peak performance output reduced compared with normal sleep. Also sleep deprived felt more tired and less motivated to train. This is just from one night of disrupted sleep.

Sitting back and thinking about the relationship of sleep and performance these results seem pretty obvious. Giving your self normal levels of sleep can improve performance and brain function. Try and make sleep more of a priority in the life balance. The choices we make, dictate the lives we live.

 

Souissi et al, (2013) Effects of time-of-day and partial sleep deprivation on short-term maximal performances of judo competitors. J Strength Cond Res.

Rae et al, (2017), One night of partial sleep deprivation impairs recovery from a single exercise training session. Eur J Appl Physiol.

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