Your future is created by what you do today, not tomorrow

So we’ve discussed the specific differences of muscle soreness after a workout and soreness from an injury. When you get Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) it is quite annoying trying to continue with training. Knowing that with DOMS we get the following problems.

  • Strength can be reduced by up to 50%
  • Range of movement will be limited
  • Pain will last between 48-72 hours

Understanding these limitations, its important to scale the weight, the depths and distances to accommodate for these temporary draw backs. But there are ways of accelerating the recovery or at least making it more tolerable.

Protein BCAA glutamine1Proteins 

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. As muscle damage is the precursor to DOMS, supplying it with a good source of Amino acids has been show to assist in recovery. While having a well balanced diet, additional supplements of glutamine and BCAA’s can reduce the inevitable weakness post workout. It may even help with soreness. (1,2,3,4)

Vitamin D

vitamin-d-en-fb.jpgGetting a little bit of sunshine might not be enough. The latest NZ Ministry of Health stats showed 32% of the population had lower than normal Vit-D levels. There is a link between people low in vitamin D and increased pain sensitivities (5). Taking supplements of Vitamin D3 may help additional soreness.

1023029.jpgHeat

Jumping in the spa pool or a using the hot water bottle. Heat is always soothing but it has longer lasting benefits to use heat with DOMS for the overall recovery (6,7).

Tart Cherry Juice

Tart cherry Juice muscle.jpgThis one is an unusual remedy but the benefits have been shown in this study (8). Following Exercise there was a 22% less weakness from the cherry drinking group, but no effect on pain. There are many natural anti inflammatory agents in cherries that is thought to help.

CoffeeCoffee Muscle soreness

I for one am pleased this is on the list, it gives me more reason to drink it! Studies have shown that caffeine helps lower pain levels and improve weakness during DOMS (9,10). Also helping increase number of reps compared to control groups.

Compression sleeveCompression Garments

Not necessarily for training, but post workout studies show that wearing compression tights or tops can reduce weakness and pain levels (11,12).

backsquat technqueTraining with DOMS

Even following the above strategies you will still have soreness and weakness. Consider this when training. You want to ensure your training for quality not quantity. Studies show training with soreness is acceptable and will temporarily reduce pain levels (13,14).

Myofascial Rolling (Foam Roller/Lacrosse ball)

Using foam rollers and lacrosse balls into tight tissues is a good way of preparing tissue for working through full ranges of movement. Through changes to mechanorecptors and nociceptors. There are studies showing benefit post workout and regular intervals during 48-72hours of DOMS (15,16).


  1. Song-Gyu, (2013), Combined effect of branched-chain amino acids and taurine supplementation on delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle damage in high-intensity eccentric exercise. J Int Soc Sports Nutri
  2. Volek et al, (2013), BCAAs reduce muscle soreness (DOMS) J Int Soc Sports Nutr.
  3. Tajari et al, (2010), Assessment of the effect of L-glutamine supplementation on DOMS 
  4. Glyn et al, (2012), Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study. J Int Soc of Sports Nutri
  5. Plotnikoff et al, (2003), Prevalence of severe hypovitaminosis D in patients with persistent, nonspecific musculoskeletal pain. Mayo Clin Proc
  6. Mayer et al. (2006), Continuous low-level heat wrap therapy for the prevention and early phase treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness of the low back: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Phys Med Rehab
  7. Petrofsky et al, (2017), The Efficacy of Sustained Heat Treatment on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness. Cl J of Sport Med
  8. Connolly et al, (2006), Efficacy of a tart cherry juice blend in preventing the symptoms of muscle damageBr J Sports Med.
  9. Maridakis et al, (2007), Caffeine attenuates delayed-onset muscle pain and force loss following eccentric exercise. J Pain
  10. Hurley et al, (2013),  The Effect of Caffeine Ingestion on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. J Strength Cond Res
  11. Hill et al, (2014), Compression garments and recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage: a meta-analysis. Brit J of Sports Med
  12. Armstrong et al (2015), Compression socks and functional recovery following marathon running: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength and Con Res
  13. Zainuddin et al, (2006), Light concentric exercise has a temporarily analgesic effect on delayed-onset muscle soreness, but no effect on recovery from eccentric exercise. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab
  14. Trevor et al, (2008), Effects of a 30-min running performed daily after downhill running on recovery of muscle function and running economy. J Sci and Med Sport, 
  15. Pearcey et al, (2015), Foam rolling for delayed-onset muscle soreness and recovery of dynamic performance measures. J Ath Training
  16. MacDonald et al, (2014). Foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense bout of physical activity. Med Sci Sports & Exs

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