You are braver than you believe,

stronger than you seem,

and smarter than you think.

~ Winnie the Pooh

YOUR PERCEPTION OF NORMAL COULD BE LIMITING YOUR GROWTH?

Our bodies are constantly adapting. I see people of all ages, from different backgrounds, each individual with their own experience of pain and weakness. Most have learned to live with this feeling and avoid certain movements through fear, apprehension or a lack of practice over time.

This restricted level of function has become their new norm.


My experience of this was quite recent. In preparation for a snowboarding trip to Mt Hutt I thought I’d get some practice in at the local indoor slope. After having not snowboarded for 2 years I was already feeling a level of anxiety knowing what was coming. Getting there I decided to have a few practice runs on the magic carpet (a beginners slope, relatively flat).

My first run went as expected, with a few falls, poor coordination of my feet, but this slowly improved. I was soon at the top of the slope back to my novice level of linking turns, still with a few falls.

At that point, I was then trying to push myself to go over small ramps, this lead to a return of anxiety. But once accepting that I can overcome this challenge and then achieve it my confidence only increased more.


For new Crossfitters the box jump can be quite a daunting obstacle. For some, it’s a movement that’s not been attempted for years. This isn’t their current norm and has been lost from their movement vocabulary. With appropriate scaling of this skill and positive reinforcement they are able to clear this milestone. Confidence quickly increases and it becomes a normal skill within their training.

Our bookends of normal function throughout life are expected to change with the onset of physical deficits. But when these restrictions are defined by lifestyle rather than capabilities our limitations are instead self-imposed.

Many people think that the body only adapts to the physical, without considering that psychological barriers could be the largest hurdle.

Thinking under the premise that “we can’t do something because we haven’t tried it” only sets us up for a limited version of ourselves. Try accepting that we are capable of doing more than we perceive, through patience of developing skills and strength. This will slowly help you define your new normal.

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